TRF Disaster Relief in Peru

In the past three weeks, Peru experienced destructive flooding and mudslides as a result of the heavy rains. Damage is concentrated in twelve coastal areas in the northern region of the country, where thousands of homes have been destroyed or severely damaged. The Peruvian government reported more than 70 fatalities to date, with thousands more forced to evacuate. Water, food, and shelter are needed immediately for those who have been displaced or lost their homes in the flooding.

In times of such disasters, The Resource Foundation quickly mobilizes resources and reaches out to its local network to assess the situation as well as local needs and responses to determine where donors’ support can be best invested. The Resource Foundation partners with local non‐profit organizations that provide long‐term reconstruction and recovery assistance in areas afflicted by natural disasters. These organizations can quickly assess needs on the ground and develop programs that provide effective long‐term assistance so that victims can rebuild their homes, reestablish their businesses, and restore their livelihoods.

People affected by the recent rains are seen in their flooded houses at the “El Indio” settlement on the outskirts of Piura, in northern Peru, on March 23, 2017.The El Nino climate phenomenon is causing muddy rivers to overflow along the entire Peruvian coast, isolating communities and neighborhoods. Photo: ERNESTO BENAVIDES/AFP/Getty Images.

TRF is currently in communication with its Peru-based partners to assess needs and identify areas for collaboration in the affected communities. Highlights include:

CADEP

The project will be focused on two main areas, including the Haquira and Mara districts in the province of Cotabamba, as well as the Velille district in Chumbivilcas. Key challenges/problems to address:

  • Harsh and unexpected climate (hail, snow, extremely heavy rains) for this time of the year, with the general population and their housing structures ill-prepared to handle and manage the situation.
  • Already low production levels among local farmers due to overly dry weather at the start of the year, which now has even greater implications related to farmers’ ability to provide food for their families.
  • Most affected crops are vegetables, quinoa, and beans, which are key components of farmers’ diets and means of food security.
  • Cold weather and lack of pastures are negatively affecting animal health.
  • Local governments did not anticipate the dire need to address risk management and response in the areas affected.

Key program activities will, therefore, include assessing destruction as it relates to housing and farming/agriculture; facilitating training workshops in risk management and adapting to the harsh climate; reestablishing family homes and applying basic building techniques so as to make the homes more suitable to the current climate; distributing seeds to affected farmers; and organizing animal health campaigns. The organization proposes to begin this project in the short-term in order to meet immediate needs of the affected communities, however, it is designed to have medium and long-term impact as it will help to revitalize and stimulate the local economies and way of life. *With a $15K-$20K donation, CADEP estimates it could reach 1,000 individuals (500 in each of the target areas) through this project.

World Vision

Key program activities include access to clean water, hygiene kit distribution, and emotional support to affected children in the Jose Leonardo Ortiz district (Chiclayo province) and Chicama district (Ascope province). This would be part of the immediate relief effort, and the organization is ready to begin these types of activities within about two weeks.* With a $15K-$20K donation, WVP estimates it could reach 270 families (roughly 1,300 individuals).

How You Can Help

Donate to the relief efforts in Peru by calling 212-675-6170 or donating online here. Donations to The Resource Foundation in support of disaster relief are tax deductible to the highest extent allowed by law.

A local resident wades through water on a street in the “El Indio” settlement on the outskirts of Piura, in northern Peru, on March 23, 2017.The El Nino climate phenomenon is causing muddy rivers to overflow along the entire Peruvian coast, isolating communities and neighborhoods. Photo: ERNESTO BENAVIDES/AFP/Getty Images.